Making your barn plans
and planning a location


A little barn planning can go a long way.

So you’ve bought that place in the country that you always wanted. Now you need to build that post and beam horse barn that has been living in your imagination for all this time. Its time to make that dream a reality. Next to your home your barn will most likely be the biggest investment you make on your land.

Location, Location, Location!

Take a walk in the rain! Watch how the water moves naturally on your property. You want a spot that is high and dry, but also fairly level. This will save you time and money later. It is better to build where you have good drainage than to bring in a lot of fill. Building up a low spot can be an expensive endeavor, and can take time, and money away from your actual timber frame barn construction.

What a view!

Take time to walk around your property and visualize where your barn fits best. Ideally you want to plan to be able to see your barn from the house. After all you are building an esthetically pleasing post and beam barn kit so you want to make the most or its stunning beauty. Be sure to locate your barn in an area that doesn’t block the best views. Plan to take advantage of your post and beam barns blocking abilities to hide any eye sores your land may have. Maybe your neighbor has an old tractor mini junk yard you want to get out of your view. This would be the perfect opportunity to screen it out of your field of view.

Bandits and varmints!

Plan for your barn to be within site of your house. You want to be able to keep an eye out for varmints. Bandits, of the four legged kind abound in the country, some are after your feed, others are after your chickens, and still others are just looking for a dry place to lay down. There are also times when you want to watch out for two legged bandits. If your barn is within view of the house it will be a less likely target for thieves.

Go to the drive in!

It would be a very good plan to locate your new post and be beam barn within easy access from a driveway. You want to be able to drive right up to it or even drive through it. Convenience is important, unloading feed, hay, and bedding is much easier if you can drive right up to your barn. It is also handy when loading or unloading horses, alpacas, goats, sheep and other livestock. Speaking of that, the ideal plan is to have a U or circle drive that goes right up to and or through your barn. Think about those long stock trailers, they need enough space to turn and maneuver. If you have one, you might measure your pickup and stock trailer, or a neighbors if you don’t. Then plan your drive up to and out of your barn to have enough room to drive straight in or straight out of your barn.

Green acres is the place to be!

Plan your barn to be close to your current or planned pasture land. The last thing you want is a long walk from your pasture to your new post and beam barn. The best plan is to have your barn connected to your pasture. Then you can have doors leading out of your stalls to a paddock or pasture. Your horses and livestock will be happier and healthier if they have room to play, a safe place out of the weather, and easy access to both.

Give me water!

Make room in your barn plans for plumbing. You may think water is not necessary in a barn. I mean its not a big deal to carry a couple buckets of water out to the barn to water the animals, right? Think again!

It is a real pain in the neck to carry buckets upon buckets of water to your barn. Especially in the winter. Believe me I know. The only broken bone I have ever had was from slipping on ice while carrying buckets of water to our animals on the dairy farm I grew up on. I slipped and fell with my full weight on my arm which landed on the edge of the bucket. It wasn’t an experience I would like to repeat.

Besides what if you plan to have a wash bay in your barn? Believe me you will want water plumbed out to your barn so plan for it. Make sure your barn is close enough to your well that it doesn’t become to expensive to run the piping. A frost free hydrant in your barn is enough to start with. You can add an automatic watering system and plumb in a wash bay when you are ready.

Light it up!

As with water you will also need adequate barn lighting and electricity. Be sure your barn is close enough to a utility pole or another building with power so that it is easy to run electricity to it. You don’t want to be stumbling around in the dark when you are investigating a strange noise coming from your barn. Plan now for adequate barn lighting.

Whatever the weather.

Think about the location of your barn in relation to typical conditions in your area. If you live in a cold climate than you might want a nice southern exposure to take advantage of the sun for heat. You may also consider the prevailing winds in your area and position your barn to be protected from them. If you live in a warmer climate you may want to place your barn in the shadow of a hill or some big trees.

What will the neighbors think?

Ok , maybe you are like Montgomery Gentry and you don’t really care what your neighbor thinks about your “big red barn”, but here in the real world we have to live with our neighbors and peace is worth a lot. Take time to talk to your neighbors, tell them about your barn plans and get their input.

You don’t necessarily have to listen to them but like they say an ounce of prevention is like a pound of cure. Discover their opinions and try to plan a barn location that makes everyone happy.

Build it!

Ok, so you have the perfect spot all picked out. Don’t worry if it doesn’t fit all the criteria above. Remember if the perfect spot isn’t quite perfect that’s ok. It shouldn’t stop you from moving forward. Are you ready to get started? Great!

Fill out the contact form below, we are ready to help you build that barn you have been dreaming of.


How to build the 20x30 sugar Shack for under $12k!  


Recent Articles

  1. 1940's 72X40 barn - Talbott, TN

    May 06, 19 03:16 PM

    My granddad and grandmother purchased this dairy farm in 1955 and barn was already there. The shed on one side l believe Is an add on. We hung tobacco

    Read More

  2. Old 38x26 farm barn Sardinia OH

    May 06, 19 03:12 PM

    Old Farm barn. We don't know much about it. It was on the property when we bought it. It is too big of a project to fix. But, has good lumber on it. It

    Read More

  3. Pleasant barn Shelby Ohio

    Apr 19, 19 04:58 AM

    This barn frame early 1850's being sold as a 40x60 frame. Heavy hewn Timbers were used in this Frame. Bent layout is (3) 20 foot Bays. Outside uprights

    Read More

  4. 1820's Sweitzer barn located in Hamilton, Ohio

    Apr 18, 19 02:30 PM

    1820's Sweitzer frame barn located in Hamilton, OH (35 minutes northwest of Cincinnati) for $85,000. Pricing is the complete package of everything from

    Read More

  5. 60x100 Red Gable Barn - Duncansville, PA

    Apr 18, 19 12:07 PM

    Old Red Barn approx 60 x 100 basement and 1st floor Duncansville, PA $2500.00 or best offer. Contact information 814-330-1863 or 814-695-0932.

    Read More

  6. 1910, 28x28, Ground Barn, Industry IL

    Apr 14, 19 08:05 PM

    Tin on both sides of roof and lean to not painted. Sides of lean to are painted red on one side. Rough sawn, hayloft, gates and bunk feeders, enclosed

    Read More

  7. White barn Shelby Oh

    Apr 14, 19 05:40 PM

    The white barn is a 40 by 75 white oak frame it has 19 foot lower eve height (very tall) the bents or tie beams are double stack spaced 6ft apart one at

    Read More

  8. Kornbau Frame Late 1830's 30x59

    Apr 11, 19 01:19 PM

    This barn is dated late 1830’s, measuring 30’x59’. The bent layout is 19’-22’-18’. You have full length 9x10 low and midrafter plates. Uprights are measuring

    Read More

  9. Sutherland Frame Early 1840's 35x45

    Apr 11, 19 01:18 PM

    This barn frame is dated early 1840’s , measuring 35’x45’ length. This frame has 4 bent sections. We have an 18’-14’-12’ bent layout. What makes this frame

    Read More

  10. Willis Frame Early 1880's 30x73

    Apr 11, 19 01:18 PM

    This barn dated early 1880’s measures 30’x73’. The barn was designed to have wide open floor space in the middle section of the barn. You have an area

    Read More

  11. Mays Frame Late 1820 40x80

    Apr 11, 19 01:17 PM

    This barn dated late 1820 measures 40’x80’ long. I love old barns with non-typical building design. The barn is spaced at (4) 20’ bays. The outside walls

    Read More

  12. 1830's 30x40 Hewn Frame Barn - Plain City, OH

    Apr 11, 19 01:11 PM

    1830's 30x40 hewn frame barn located in Plain City, OH (suburb of Columbus) for $48,000. Pricing is the complete package of everything from the ground

    Read More

  13. 80 year old barn (fallen), - Otiso, Indiana

    Apr 11, 19 01:10 PM

    Old Barn that has mostly fallen. In its day was more of a gable barn with the second floor used for hay and tobacco. The first floor had a separate room

    Read More

  14. Late 1800s 2-story Barn Swarthmore, PA

    Apr 09, 19 02:03 PM

    Barn built around 1886 for small farm in Philadelphia area college town. This two-story barn is 20' x 31'. The barn has a hay loft above the second floor

    Read More

  15. Old 40'x 50' Gable Barn Battle Creek, MI

    Apr 08, 19 03:15 PM

    As is Old 1800 Gable Barn 40x50 with steel roof. Hand hewn Beech wood beams 10' to 20' they are 8x8. They are join by mortise and tenon with wooden pegs.

    Read More